Farming has a lot of benefits. Aside from being able to grow your own food, it can also be a source of leisure, or a platform to try new things.

But one problem that most people who want to try farming are concerned with is space. In order to grow crops, there has to be a specific amount of land allotted for these to flourish. This is a privilege that some people in the metro do not get to experience.

Still, there are others who don’t let this get to them and who have made the concrete jungle a place where organic produce thrives. In addition, they’ve also found new ways to sustain their garden despite the conditions in the city.

To help you get inspired to try urban farming, we’ve collated some articles about farmers in the metro and how they’ve managed to turn a seemingly rural activity into an urban pastime, and in some cases, a source of income.

Prior to starting your own urban farm, you should be aware of the benefits of doing so. This article will help you discover these advantages when it comes to growing your own food. 

Because space is limited in the city, there’s a farming method called small-scale farming that could reap a lot of rewards even from just a small range. Read about it here

For those who have a spacious rooftop with no idea what to do with it, here’s a story about an urban farmer and how she reaps the benefits of the rooftop garden that she started. 

To keep plants well-fed, you need look no further than your kitchen for scraps that can be turned into fertilizer. There are many methods to choose from. All you need to compost the bokashi way is a small drum with a faucet, or if you have access to a bigger plot of land, you can do it the traditional way.

If you’re not sure on how and where to begin with urban gardening, there are several start-ups that can give the right nudge toward planting your first seed in the city.

Qubo.ph and MNL Growkits are shops that provide people with the basic and necessary items they need in order to plant food right in the comfort of their own homes. Here are links to the articles about these stores.

But if you’re planning to take on a more advanced route, here’s an article about a tech startup that incorporates hydroponics into your urban farm. 

Limited space, a concrete jungle, or a lack of knowledge need not be hindrances to your farming dreams. Just ask this woman who learned and built an edible garden from scratch. 

Whether you want to plant for food, for stress relief, or companionship (don’t we all talk to our plants?), the best thing you can do as a potential newbie is to take the first step.